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Shayne Noller oversees the daily operations of the cut room and the shipping department at MacFarlane Pheasants. The birds are processed and cleaned at Twin Cities Pack, located in Clinton, WI, just a few miles south of the farm. Read More »


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William (Bill) MacFarlane has been leading MacFarlane Pheasants since he was 24 years old. He followed his uncle, Ken MacFarlane, and his dad, Don MacFarlane, into the family business after graduating from the University of Houston in 1979. Read More »


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In addition to hearing speakers who will cover all aspects of the pheasant industry, you’ll have the opportunity to network, meet up with old friends, and make new ones. Read More »


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Water is essential for life and is considered an essential nutrient. Death will occur quickly in both plants and animals when insufficient water is available. Read More »


Open Space

On December 4, 2015 in Archive by spope

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Having the correct open space in a flight pen is just as important as having cover.  The thicker your cover, the more open space you need.  Pheasants need a place to sun themselves, dry off or dust.  If the entire pen is full of cover the birds will get ornery. Read More »


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Don and Ken MacFarlane grew up together on a farm 10 miles east of Janesville, Wisconsin, that their grandfather had established in 1849 when he emigrated from Scotland. Read More »


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William (Bill) MacFarlane, the president of MacFarlane Pheasants, has been leading the business for 36 years, but the evolution of the company began 86 years ago with the dreams of Bill’s uncle, Ken MacFarlane. Read More »


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One of the more exciting moments on our farm is when baby chicks begin to hatch. However, there are many steps to complete in the brooder barns before hatching begins, to prepare for the 500,000 chicks we hatch each year. Read More »