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Once our brooding season is complete, we still have work to do at MacFarlane Pheasants. This year’s major off-season projects were deep cleaning, maintenance, and organization. Brian Davis, our Brooder manager, explains our reasoning perfectly. “Deep cleaning adds integrity to our biosecurity plan and helps our equipment run properly. Organization and equipment inventory save people-hours, make us more efficient, and keep us ready if we have an equipment breakdown during the season." Read More »

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Troy Cisewski, our Production Manager, oversees the three MacFarlane Pheasants’ farms in Missouri. They are all located within a 30-minute driving distance of each other. The primary purpose for having the Missouri farms is biosecurity. Multiple egg sources protect us if a disease occurs and other farms would need to be quarantined. Another safety measure we employ at the Missouri sites is to have designated employees at each location to eliminate cross-traffic contamination. The Missouri sites also free pen space in Janesville for our famous flight birds. Read More »


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The brooder crew is always busy at MacFarlane Pheasants, Inc. Crew members are responsible for the youngest chicks on our farm so their work is intensive and important. We have two shifts per day. Read More »


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Our job posting for a brooder crew worker lists the basic skills needed to work anywhere on our farm. A crew member needs to be: responsible, dependable, motivated, have organizational skills, common sense, acute attention to detail, have a valid driver’s license, and be able to lift 50 pounds or more. Read More »


Record Keeping In The Brooder Barn

On November 14, 2017 in Brooder by spope

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Record keeping is essential to making business decisions at MacFarlane Pheasants. In the brooder barns we record key information on a daily basis. There is a mortality sheet in each workroom. The workroom is a special room for sanitation right before the chick barn. Information recorded at the top of the mortality sheet includes the barn number, the number of chicks placed into the room and the hatch date. Read More »


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The below 0 degree temperatures and wind chill days, this week, have been busy times in the brooder barns. We pay special attention to our birds when it is so cold, but the real work begins BEFORE the first hard frost. When we start to have cooler nights, we go around the farm turning on baseboard heaters to heat the boot room areas to make sure they are operating properly, before the big freezes! Read More »


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The brooder crew in August have only a distant memory of grasses, trees, and shrubs turning green with the longer days and feeling the excitement of the first hatches. The final Ringneck hatches occur the week of August 15th. It is still hot and humid in August but we realize that it is time to shift gears and think about preparations for fall and winter. Read More »


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It is extremely important to maintain a clean, dry environment for our birds to live in while they are in our barns. Usually the housekeeping is done during our regular barn chores. However, sometimes the cleaning takes a little longer, so we add an extra crew member to speed up the process. That might mean adding a time in our schedule for barn housekeeping after lunch and before afternoon barn checks. Once a barn is flagged for housekeeping, we make it a priority to get it done right away. Read More »